The National Day on Writing

The Writing Circle celebrated National Day on Writing with chalking, a nine hour writing marathon and thought banner in the Writing Center on Oct. 20, 2015.

Maye Zerull, co-President of Writing Circle, dresses up as a 'oxford comma' in front of Anspach Hall for the National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

Maye Zerull, co-President of Writing Circle, dresses up as a ‘oxford comma’ in front of Anspach Hall for the National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015.

 

Lake City graduate student Carrie Prolega chalks the sidewalk in front of Anspach Hall for the National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

Lake City graduate student Carrie Prolega chalks the sidewalk in front of Anspach Hall for the National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015.

 

Illinois graduate student Meagan Blacker chalks the sidewalk in front of Anspach Hall, despite the rain, for the National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

Illinois graduate student Meagan Blacker chalks the sidewalk in front of Anspach Hall, despite the rain, for the National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015.

 

Lexington graduate student Abigail Hollingsworth, co-president of Writing Circle, begins her shift of the nine hour writing marathon as part of National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

Lexington graduate student Abigail Hollingsworth, co-president of Writing Circle, begins her shift of the nine hour writing marathon as part of National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015.

 

Lexington graduate student Abigail Hollingsworth, president of Writing Circle, begins her shift of the nine hour writing marathon as part of National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015. Participants were allowed to read only the previous page of the story before adding their own section during the marathon that started at 9 a.m. and ends at 6:30 p.m. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

Lexington graduate student Abigail Hollingsworth, president of Writing Circle, begins her shift of the nine hour writing marathon as part of National Day on Writing on Oct. 20, 2015. Participants were allowed to read only the previous page of the story before adding their own section during the marathon that started at 9 a.m. and ends at 6:30 p.m.

 

A thought banner for The National Day on Writing is written on a white board in Anspach 154 on Oct .20, 2015. Anspach 154 is also one writing center on campus, where student consultants collaborate with other students to improve aspects of their writing. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

A thought banner for The National Day on Writing is written on a white board in Anspach 154 on Oct .20, 2015. Anspach 154 is also one writing center on campus, where student consultants collaborate with other students to improve aspects of their writing.

 

Notes and snacks left for participants in the nine hour writing marathon located on the fourth floor the writing center in the Charles V Park Library on Oct. 20, 2015. Kaiti Chritz | Photo Editor

Notes and snacks left for participants in the nine hour writing marathon located on the fourth floor the writing center in the Charles V Park Library on Oct. 20, 2015.

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Destined to Drum

Jacob Elliott, a Central Michigan University Astronomy major, has had a passion for drumming from a young age. With over seven years of drumming experience he is now the section leader of the Marching Chippewas drumline.

An Introduction

I am a Central Michigan University student majoring in biology and photojournalism. This unique combination of passions had lead me to many places filled with incredible opportunities, and a unique look at journalism as a study.

This summer I had the opportunity to intern for Alaska National Parks. I wrote 2 blog posts for Katmai National Park, one about collaring brown bears and the other about brown bear observations, and made multiple photo and video packages for a number of parks and affiliations.

This job in particular fueled my passion for scientific photojournalism. I welcome you to follow me in my journey to share the stories of scientists across the world.

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Dreams

Where am I at now?

I’m still in the awkward middle ground of being a science nerd with an almost completed biology degree while working the beginnings of a photojournalism degree. I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.

My passion for photography has developed more than I ever thought it could. I’ll admit, although I do not like the traditional ‘hard hitting’ news that my studies are focused on, I am getting more comfortable approaching and interviewing people about news worthy stories. That’s saying a lot for me. I never would have gone up to someone I didn’t know and ask them about themselves before getting involved in journalism. I’m thankful for this new skill I gained. It’s making me a better photographer- no doubt.

So where do I hope to go? My lifelong goal is to make a photo series or video about some issue in animal ethics that is viewed on a large scale. I hope to bring this topic into the minds of people around the world who have never thought about it, and to the forefront of people’s minds who have. There has to be a reason I have these strong opposite passions in me, and combining them is the only thing that makes sense.

Of course, that’s not going to be a lifelong project that will provide me the money I need to live in our culture. I hope to work for some kind of nature, wildlife or science publication as a photographer. I would also like to be a staff photographer at a zoo, museum, national park, or something along those lines as well. Any of the above jobs would combine my passions and let me share them with others- which is my main goal.

I have found professionals to admire that have combined both of these fields including James Balog who is known for showing the effects of global climate change through photos of ice, and Joel Sartore who is known for his portraits of endangered animals.

I have a long way to go before having my dreams fulfilled, but the best part about it is I can’t wait for that long journey to take off. My portfolio, no doubt, needs work and will always be improving. I’ll always be appreciative of what both subject areas have given me in the educational journey, no matter how much they may differ.

 

 

Cheers,

Kaiti

Girl Genius

I’m sitting here watching “Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius.” I know, you’re insanely jealous of my tragically awesome spring break activities. Remember that one? It’s an animated children’s movie about a boy genius who invents things in his spare time. One day he sends a satellite up into space and makes contact with aliens who end up stealing all the parents from the earth- resulting in children who don’t know how to care for themselves. You’ll have to watch the rest to recall what happens after, but this movie is blowing my mind.

I doubt any of the scientific things he’s saying would have made any sense to me when I was a kid because I’m just catching on to them now.

“Hang on- we’re passing through the stratosphere, now the mesosphere. entering ionosphere… Now I know why they all end in fear.”

What child would know what in the world those are? I certainly do now. My roommate majoring in meteorology made sure of that.  I’m not even sure the characters in the movie understand what they’re saying.

What a wacky time of entertainment. Even back then I knew I’d be a nerd for the rest of my life. I remember embracing this odd little film as a triumph of nerds around the world even in my childhood.

Don’t worry, someone out there appreciates the past memories of Jimmy Neutron too. Here’s a blog dedicated to the Revival of “Jimmy Neutron” just in case I sparked an old flame of passion from your childhood.

 

Cheers,

Kaiti

 

 

Biased

I’ve got my cup of coffee, I have a documentary playing behind me and I could not be happier to blog about this subject.

I have such an interest in whales. They fascinate me. Where it comes from- I honestly have no idea. Here’s the sad thing…I’ve never even seen a whale in the wild before. Yep, that’s right. I’m a fake.

Think about this though- they’re mammals just like us, but they live in the water. It’s thought that we come from the same descendent. They breathe air and bear live young. I won’t bore you with all the specifications of being a mammal, but it is incredible to think about the fact that we’re connected to such an incredible group of animals.

If you haven’t seen “Blackfish,” I recommend you watch it- but definitely with a skeptical mindset. The movie is criticized for being a biased representation of the subject- which makes some question its classification as a documentary. Now some of the trainers of the film are coming out and saying that they never would have agreed to an interview for the film if they knew this was how their words were going to be portrayed. Here’s an interview form one of the trainers featured in the film, but if you want to skip the heavy reading, here’s an excerpt:

“Blackfish was a complete ‘180’ from what was originally presented to me.  Now, it’s almost like my worst fears are unfolding in front of me. When I first spoke with Tim and Gabriela, I truly felt like they were as passionate about the animals’ welfare as I was. I felt they believed in the relationships and respected my experiences and insight.”

When looking at it from a journalist’s perspective the movie seems biased and bias isn’t something that journalists are encouraged to let pass them by. I hope someone makes a documentary to follow “Blackfish” with other perspectives on the matter, possibly one that offers a solution to the problems presented instead of unleashing millions of activists who are angry and have no clear solution to work toward.

Some think that having killer whales in captivity should be stopped completely and all whales should be set free, but this could be cruel to the animals that have known nothing but captivity. Possibly an open water pen in the ocean that keeps the animals in human’s care. Another option is to stop the orca breeding program completely and let the captive line of animals die of natural causes and never put another wild orca in captivity again. There are so many ideas of what “we should do” out there, but the truth is nothing will change unless laws are made, and even then there would be so many things to figure out. I truly believe that one day marine mammal parks won’t exist, but I don’t know if that day will come in my lifetime.

Well, I certainly have strong opinions on the matter. Good thing this is a bias filled blog!